March 31, 2014
PHILIA: Performance In Process //
4/4/14 at 7:00 PM //
ORION CROOK x PRINCE DIANA x XANDER ALEXANDER

PHILIA: Performance In Process //

4/4/14 at 7:00 PM //

ORION CROOK x PRINCE DIANA x XANDER ALEXANDER

7:23pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZzJ_-s1Blxhgz
  
Filed under: performance ART 
March 24, 2014










Tonight!


Dispose is a curatorial experiment by Steffen Sornpao, utilizing eight photographers to generate content to be played with in an installation format. Based off the word dispose meaning, “to put in a particular or the proper order or arrangement,” the show creates an environment of methodically placed images to activate the space and blur the lines between show room and installation. The role as curator, artist, and participant are intertwined to create a singular photographic experience. The viewer is subjected to construct relationships and conversation between images coming from multiple sources.Curated by:Steffen SornpaoPhotographers:Brandon EnglishJeff HopperPastiche LumumbaRiley O’shaughnessyMax RamsSteffen SornpaoJordan StubbsAustin YappExhibition Dates: Monday, March 24th-April 11thOpening Reception: Monday, March 24th 7-10pmGallery Hours: By appointment onlyThe Low Museum550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave NEAtlanta, GA 30312

Tonight!
Dispose is a curatorial experiment by Steffen Sornpao, utilizing eight photographers to generate content to be played with in an installation format. Based off the word dispose meaning, “to put in a particular or the proper order or arrangement,” the show creates an environment of methodically placed images to activate the space and blur the lines between show room and installation. The role as curator, artist, and participant are intertwined to create a singular photographic experience. The viewer is subjected to construct relationships and conversation between images coming from multiple sources.

Curated by:
Steffen Sornpao

Photographers:
Brandon English
Jeff Hopper
Pastiche Lumumba
Riley O’shaughnessy
Max Rams
Steffen Sornpao
Jordan Stubbs
Austin Yapp

Exhibition Dates: Monday, March 24th-April 11th
Opening Reception: Monday, March 24th 7-10pm
Gallery Hours: By appointment only

The Low Museum
550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30312

February 13, 2014

"Trophy Scarves" by Nate Hill

SUPREMATICISM: CULTURAL AND AESTHETIC WHITENESS

Sophia Frissell | Devidyal Givens | Charity Harris | Nate Hill | Theodore McLee | Rebecca Price | Estela Semeco | Marcus Tanner | Beau Torres | Laura Vela | Patricia Villafane | Louis CK

CURATOR STATEMENT

White is everywhere. The color serves as the ‘neutral’ walls of art galleries and museums. Paintings begin with a ‘blank’ canvas. This text is printed on white paper. Beau Torres’s “Suprematism/Supremacism” is  also on white paper but the text is white and it nearly disappears in its own ‘neutral’ background. A major aspect of dominance is that it functions largely by being invisible, casting all that is not dominant into the category of “Other”. And so culturally, beyond the realm of just aesthetic whiteness, White people themselves function in a similar vain by representing the “norm”, and thus become centered as “default” human beings, which juxtaposes all who are marked as racially different as the subsequent Other in this circumstance, and affirms the privilege inherent in racial Whiteness. In his photo,”Asshole”, Marcus Tanner begs the question of the limits surrounding White privilege, by interestingly pointing to its embodiment in self-selected homelessness, which calls us to examine something seemingly out of place, and forces us to ask why such an event is outside of the realm of what we commonly see and expect in regard to white bodies in our current economic environment of capitalism. By playing with both this cultural phenomenon of Whiteness as capital, as well as other themes of literal capitalism and heteronormativity, Patricia Villafane’s photo series takes White bodies and literally transforms them into human models by making mannequins of them. What results is an incredibly blatant depiction of Whiteness, which is rarely the topic of conversation within a U.S. context, in which White people are the racial majority. However, this is not the case in San Pedro, Guatemala where Devidyal Givens’ daughter, Trinidad, stands out on a street populated with brown bodies. White bodies do not stand out in the US. In fact, the ubiquity of their privilege often lends them a stake in defining the standard of beauty, which Laura Vela’s illustrates in her painting, “Brown Grrrl, White Doll” by looking into the early age at which this standard of beauty is introduced. Her piece conjures to mind the detrimental  effects such a standard can have on the self image of young girls of color who are already subject to objectification in a generally misogynistic society. Exploring similar notions, Estela Semeco’s “Suck it In” features tampons, a chiefly western method of feminine hygiene  and “refers to the bloated, dissatisfied sensation many women may be familiar with in relation to their own bodies.” In advertisements, such as those in Rebecca Price’s “Sexy Wallpaper” white bodies are so pervasive that even non-white bodies are subsumed by conforming to the white standard of beauty.  Charity Harris’ “Bloom” is a dress made of coffee filters but it cannot escape the connotation of the white wedding gown which symbolizes virginity. The misnomer of white purity is evident in Theodore McLee’s “Natural, Wholesome, Pure” that features normalized foods that are in fact all bleached. The purity of whiteness here is manufactured. These standards privilege white women in that the qualities attached to aesthetic whiteness such as purity and innocence become invaluable when placed on the stage of patriarchy. Nate Hill satirizes this value with his “Trophy Scarves” portraits in which he “wear[s] white women for status and power.” While Hill’s satire functions by leveraging racism against misogyny, the valuation of the white female body functions conversely in Sophia Frissell’s “Missing” which is based on the artist’s escape from an attempted kidnapping during which she lost a shoe among other things in the perpetrator’s trunk.

January 22, 2014

burnawayga:

Creative Loafing mentioned the Low Museum today. It’s on the “Boulevard Ridge,” the first ridge east of the Peachtree Street ridge and a very fine feeling outdoor space like few others in Atlanta. 

January 21, 2014
February is #WhiteHistoryMonth at the Low. The monthlong program also features a special white Videogramme and a panel discussion on Whiteness.
SUPREMATI’CISM: Cultural and Aesthetic Whiteness
Monday February 10th    7-10PM
The Low Museum
550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave Unit A // ATL GA

February is #WhiteHistoryMonth at the Low. The monthlong program also features a special white Videogramme and a panel discussion on Whiteness.

SUPREMATI’CISM: Cultural and Aesthetic Whiteness

Monday February 10th    7-10PM

The Low Museum

550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave Unit A // ATL GA

December 20, 2013
Hashtags for fine art at the newly minted Low Museum

The Low Museum in Creative Loafing

December 16, 2013
TONIGHT 7PM-UNTIL… @ thelowmuseum
THE SECOND IN OUR SERIES OF DRUNK CRITIQUES. BYOB. BRING A VOICE. BE PREPARED TO CRITICALLY ENGAGE CONTEMPORARY CULTURE THROUGH ARTS AND THE LIKE.

TONIGHT 7PM-UNTIL… @ thelowmuseum

THE SECOND IN OUR SERIES OF DRUNK CRITIQUES. BYOB. BRING A VOICE. BE PREPARED TO CRITICALLY ENGAGE CONTEMPORARY CULTURE THROUGH ARTS AND THE LIKE.

December 12, 2013
The name of the exhibition is a portmanteau of “Suprematism” and [white] “Supremacy”. The term SUPREMATISM, coined by russian painter/theorist Kasmir Malevich, refers to an abstract art based upon “the supremacy of pure artistic feeling” rather than on visual depiction of objects. One of Malevich’s most famous suprematist works “White on White”, is a painting of a white square on a white background. WHITE SUPREMACY is the belief of, and/or promotion of the belief, that white people are superior to people of other racial backgrounds. SUPREMATI’CISM juxtaposes the cultural meme of white supremacy with the artistic meme of white as neutral, invisible, pure, etc. This is an open call for work in any medium that addresses cultural or aesthetic whiteness. This call is not exclusive to art. Feel free to interpret whiteness in any form. Pieces do not have to be visually white.possible topics include but are not limited to:AlbinismThe neutrality of gallery walls, pedestalsWhite supremacyPaperWhite JesusMiley CyrusLight"Oreos", "Bananas", etc.Food BleachingNegative SpaceWhite History MonthPlease email submissions/questions tothelowmuseum@gmail.com Deadline for submissions Friday January 17th at 5pmAccepted submissions will be alerted by Monday January 20thDropoff between January 21st and January 30thOpening reception Monday February 10th7-10pm at The Low MuseumArtist Talk Monday February 17th7-10 at The Low Museum

The name of the exhibition is a portmanteau of “Suprematism” and [white] “Supremacy”. The term SUPREMATISM, coined by russian painter/theorist Kasmir Malevich, refers to an abstract art based upon “the supremacy of pure artistic feeling” rather than on visual depiction of objects. One of Malevich’s most famous suprematist works “White on White”, is a painting of a white square on a white background. WHITE SUPREMACY is the belief of, and/or promotion of the belief, that white people are superior to people of other racial backgrounds. SUPREMATI’CISM juxtaposes the cultural meme of white supremacy with the artistic meme of white as neutral, invisible, pure, etc. 

This is an open call for work in any medium that addresses cultural or aesthetic whiteness. This call is not exclusive to art. Feel free to interpret whiteness in any form. Pieces do not have to be visually white.

possible topics include but are not limited to:
Albinism
The neutrality of gallery walls, pedestals
White supremacy
Paper
White Jesus
Miley Cyrus
Light
"Oreos", "Bananas", etc.
Food Bleaching
Negative Space
White History Month

Please email submissions/questions to
thelowmuseum@gmail.com 
Deadline for submissions Friday January 17th at 5pm
Accepted submissions will be alerted by Monday January 20th
Dropoff between January 21st and January 30th

Opening reception Monday February 10th
7-10pm at The Low Museum

Artist Talk Monday February 17th
7-10 at The Low Museum

November 13, 2013

pastichelumumba:

Pastiche Lumumba : A Retrospective

thelowmuseum November 11-25th

Pastiche Lumumba’s first solo exhibition translates memes into an art historical context and vice-versa.

November 1, 2013
L.A. Rebellion Conversation
Saturday November 2nd // 10pm @ The Low Museum
550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave Unit A // Atlanta, GA
In conjunction with the L.A. Rebellion Tour ATL and Liquid Blackness, The Low Museum is hosting a conversation following the screenings of Billy Woodbury’s films ‘The Pocketbook’ and ‘Bless Their Little Hearts’.Liquid blackness, a newly launched research initiative on blackness and aesthetics of the Department of Communication at Georgia State University, will facilitate “Conversations” with filmmakers, students, and scholars at local venues and coordinate an interactive social media experience.visit http://liquidblackness.com/ for the screening schedule and more information about the films.

L.A. Rebellion Conversation

Saturday November 2nd // 10pm @ The Low Museum

550 John Wesley Dobbs Ave Unit A // Atlanta, GA

In conjunction with the L.A. Rebellion Tour ATL and Liquid Blackness, The Low Museum is hosting a conversation following the screenings of Billy Woodbury’s films ‘The Pocketbook’ and ‘Bless Their Little Hearts’.

Liquid blackness, a newly launched research initiative on blackness and aesthetics of the Department of Communication at Georgia State University, will facilitate “Conversations” with filmmakers, students, and scholars at local venues and coordinate an interactive social media experience.

visit http://liquidblackness.com/ for the screening schedule and more information about the films.

1:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZzJ_-szCMI8T
  
Filed under: film la rebellion black cinema AFF